Banks Announce Significant Dividend Increases & Buybacks Following the 2019 Fed Stress Test Results

Friday, June 28, 2019

Banks Announce Significant Dividend Increases & Buybacks Following the 2019 Fed Stress Test Results

US large banks* announced significant dividend increases and share buyback authorizations following the announcement of this year’s Federal Reserve stress test results on June 27th. In aggregate, the twelve largest US banks will have dividend yields of 3.2% and authorization to buyback 9.3% of their outstanding stock over the next twelve months. Relative to last year, dividends for the group are up 9.5%. The buyback increase is even more dramatic—the total repurchase authorization is 25% higher for the twelve largest banks, driven by massive increases at Bank of America and JP Morgan.

US large banks* announced significant dividend increases and share buyback authorizations following the announcement of this year’s Federal Reserve stress test results on June 27th. In aggregate, the twelve largest US banks will have dividend yields of 3.2% and authorization to buyback 9.3% of their outstanding stock over the next twelve months. Relative to last year, dividends for the group are up 9.5%. The buyback increase is even more dramatic—the total repurchase authorization is 25% higher for the twelve largest banks, driven by massive increases at Bank of America and JP Morgan.

Has the Fed gone soft? Judging by the severely adverse scenario that formed the basis of the Fed’s analysis, the answer is no. The stress test this year included:

  • 50% equity market drop
  • 25% home price drop
  • 35% commercial real estate price drop
  • 10% unemployment

Each bank’s balance sheet was tested to see if it could withstand the credit defaults that would accompany this severely adverse scenario. The twelve largest US banks all performed well in the stress test, giving bank regulators the confidence to allow the high return of capital. JP Morgan and Capital One had to moderate their initial requests (using the so-called ‘Mulligan provision’), but this likely reflects aggressive initial asks more than anything else.

The news for mid-sized banks** with assets between $100 billion and $250 billion was not quite as clear. These banks were allowed to use the 2018 stress test results as a basis for their 2019 dividend and share repurchase requests. Some of these banks issued press releases with their approved capital plans on June 27th following the Fed’s announcement on large banks. Others did not. Note that all mid-sized banks passed the test in 2018, so we don’t believe there’s bad news lurking from a regulatory perspective. What we do not know is exactly how much dividends and buybacks will increase for these mid-sized banks. For the mid-sized banks that have made announcements, capital return plans are roughly in-line with the large banks.

Overall, our investment thesis for banks remains in place. Both dividends and share repurchases remain well-above the levels found in the market as a whole. Concerns about safety are mitigated by the results of the Federal Reserve stress test. While the risk of widespread loan defaults will always exist, we believe US banks have now built a substantial capital buffer that should allow them to continue paying dividends in all but the most extreme circumstances.

Banks Announce Dividend Increases, Buybacks Following 2019 Fed Stress Test

* US large banks are those with assets greater than $250 billion and include: Bank of America, Bank of NY-Mellon, Capital One, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan Chase, Morgan Stanley, Northern Trust, PNC, State Street, US Bancorp, and Wells Fargo.
**US mid-sized banks are those with assets between $100 billion and $250 billion and include: Ally Financial, American Express, BB&T, Citizens Financial Group, Discover Financial Services, Fifth Third Bancorp, Huntington Bancshares, Keycorp, M&T Bank, Regions Financial Corporation, and SunTrust Banks.
Dividend increases and buybacks are based on announcements in company press releases.
Source: The Federal Reserve, Bloomberg, company press releases, and Miller/Howard Research & Analysis.
As of June 27, 2019: JP Morgan was held in Miller/Howard strategies; Bank of America and Capital One were not held in Miller/Howard strategies.


Gregory Powell, PhD, oversees the Portfolio Management Team. Greg is the designated lead or co-lead Portfolio Manager on the firm’s core strategies. In addition, he holds a position on Miller/Howard’s Executive Committee. Greg joined Miller/Howard in 2017 following a distinguished 19-year career as a portfolio manager and director of research at AllianceBernstein. At AB, he managed a team of 12 analysts and a suite of products with $11 billion in AUM. He also served as head of fundamental value research there, redesigning the analyst role with an emphasis on investment success and training analysts in all aspects of the position. He holds a BA in Economics/Mathematics from the University of California Santa Barbara, and a PhD and MA in Economics from Northwestern University.

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Opinions and estimates offered constitute Miller/Howard Investments' judgment and are subject to change without notice, as are statements of financial market trends, which are based on current market conditions. Nothing stated herein, including the mention of specific company names, should be construed as a recommendation to buy, hold, or sell any security, sector, or MLPs in general. All investments carry a certain degree of risk, including possible loss of principal. It is important to note that there are risks inherent in any investment and there can be no assurance that any asset class will provide positive performance over any period of time. The material may also contain forward-looking statements that involve risk and uncertainty, and there is no guarantee they will come to pass.

Common stocks do not assure dividend payments. Dividends are paid only when declared by an issuer’s board of directors, and the amount of any dividend may vary over time. Dividend yield is one component of performance and should not be the only consideration for investment.

The information above is from sources deemed to be reliable and is provided strictly for the convenience of our investors and their advisors. These materials are solely informational. Legal, accounting and tax restrictions, transaction costs, and changes to any assumptions may significantly affect the economics of any transaction.

The information and analyses contained herein are not intended as tax, legal, or investment advice and may not be appropriate for your specific circumstances; accordingly, you should consult your own tax, legal, investment, or other advisors, at both the outset of any transaction and on an ongoing basis, to determine such appropriateness. Any investment returns — past, hypothetical, or otherwise — are not indicative of future performance.

Investment Decisions: Do not use this report as the sole basis for investment decisions. Do not select an allocation, investment discipline, or investment manager based on performance alone. Consider, in addition to performance results, other relevant information about each investment manager, as well as matters such as your investment objectives, risk tolerance, and investment time horizon.

Past performance does not guarantee future results.

© 2020 Miller/Howard Investments.

DISCLOSURE

INVESTMENT PRODUCTS: ARE NOT FDIC INSURED - MAY LOSE VALUE - ARE NOT BANK GUARANTEED

Opinions and estimates offered constitute Miller/Howard Investments' judgment and are subject to change without notice, as are statements of financial market trends, which are based on current market conditions. Nothing stated herein, including the mention of specific company names, should be construed as a recommendation to buy, hold, or sell any security, sector, or MLPs in general. All investments carry a certain degree of risk, including possible loss of principal. It is important to note that there are risks inherent in any investment and there can be no assurance that any asset class will provide positive performance over any period of time. The material may also contain forward-looking statements that involve risk and uncertainty, and there is no guarantee they will come to pass.

Common stocks do not assure dividend payments. Dividends are paid only when declared by an issuer’s board of directors, and the amount of any dividend may vary over time. Dividend yield is one component of performance and should not be the only consideration for investment.

The information above is from sources deemed to be reliable and is provided strictly for the convenience of our investors and their advisors. These materials are solely informational. Legal, accounting and tax restrictions, transaction costs, and changes to any assumptions may significantly affect the economics of any transaction.

The information and analyses contained herein are not intended as tax, legal, or investment advice and may not be appropriate for your specific circumstances; accordingly, you should consult your own tax, legal, investment, or other advisors, at both the outset of any transaction and on an ongoing basis, to determine such appropriateness. Any investment returns — past, hypothetical, or otherwise — are not indicative of future performance.

Investment Decisions: Do not use this report as the sole basis for investment decisions. Do not select an allocation, investment discipline, or investment manager based on performance alone. Consider, in addition to performance results, other relevant information about each investment manager, as well as matters such as your investment objectives, risk tolerance, and investment time horizon.

Past performance does not guarantee future results.

© 2020 Miller/Howard Investments.